Health & Environment

Can We Forecast A Weather Disaster Years Before It Happens?

Texas A&M's iHESP lab seeks to develop a new advanced modeling framework for high-resolution multiscale Earth System predictions.
By Texas A&M University Division of Research and College of Geosciences October 18, 2019

As the world comes to terms with extreme weather produced by climate change, the scientists at the new International Laboratory for High-Resolution Earth System Prediction (iHESP) are creating an advanced modeling framework to improve long-term forecasting.

These models will convert detailed weather data into high-resolution, multi-scale images at the global and regional scales. The lab combines the expertise of three world-class institutions: Qingdao Pilot National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Texas A&M University and the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

Ping Chang, professor of oceanography and atmospheric sciences and holder of the Louis and Elizabeth Scherck Chair in Oceanography in the College of Geosciences, serves as iHESP director. The iHESP lab seeks to develop a new advanced modeling framework for high-resolution multiscale Earth System predictions and provide reliable information at both global and regional scales.

“iHESP will establish Texas A&M University as the leader in climate modeling,” said Jack Baldauf, senior associate vice president for research. “The new knowledge generated from this program will allow decision makers, policy makers the ability to make informed decisions.”

This story by the College of Geosciences was written in collaboration with the Division of Research.

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