Aggies Respond to Harvey

100 Stories of Selfless Service

A THANK YOU FROM TEXAS A&M PRESIDENT MICHAEL K. YOUNG

Words cannot begin to describe how proud I am of the Aggie community in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. Current and former students, faculty and staff have stepped up in the most amazing ways to help their fellow Texans survive and begin to recover from this devastating storm. From the bottom of my heart, thank you for putting the Aggie Core Value of selfless service front and center.

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Students

Galveston student rescues family

Austin Seth helped rescue a family and their pets from their flooded home in Dickinson while escorting a CNN television crew on his boat.

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Students

Aggie brothers help rescue 14 flood victims

Blake and Brodie Smith assisted their father in rescuing stranded flood victims by boat.

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Students

Students assisted Bryan-College Station residents

Dozens of Aggies traveled in groups around town, picking up trash and fallen trees.

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Students

Cadets teamed up with the Texas National Guard

Twenty-six current members of the Corps of Cadets deployed with the Texas National Guard to assist in relief operations.

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Students

Harvey hit close to home for Aggie football players

The Texas A&M Football roster includes 35 players from the area affected by the storm.

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Students

Volleyball star copes with Harvey’s destruction

Corpus Christi native Hollann Hans’ family was able to evacuate the city before the hurricane moved over the town.

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Students

Student spent two days making rescues

Kyle Holmes rescued families from flood waters in Dickinson and Friendswood, launching from an I-45 overpass.

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Students

Service on a day off

After Texas A&M canceled classes, the Garrett family thanked the anonymous Aggies who came to their aid in Cinco Ranch.

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Students

Sharing stories of service

Battalion assistant sports editor Alex Miller shared his experience helping Houston residents during Hurricane Harvey.

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Students

An act of service captured from afar

A woman shared a story on Facebook describing how Aggies were able to rescue an elderly woman from a flooded home in Katy.

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Students

Coming to the aid of Rosenberg residents

A Dallas-Fort Worth NBC affiliate talked to Texas A&M students who sent water and food to flood victims in the name of selfless service.

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Students

Student body president rallied students

Current Student Body President Bobby Brooks used his platform to drum up support for post-Harvey relief efforts.

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Students

VET students serve

Fourth-year veterinary students on the Veterinary Emergency Team (VET) tended to 10 search and rescue canines and interacted with their handlers.

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Students

The Chabad Jewish Center lends a hand

Rabbi Yossi and Manya Lazaroff, the Shluchim in College Station, mobilized students to provide support for Harvey victims.

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Students

Aggie Basketball players share personal stories

Texas natives on the basketball team discussed how the hurricane impacted them directly and urged fans to #BTHOHarvey.

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Students

Women's basketball provided aid

The Aggie women’s team helped the Brazos Valley Food Bank sort 5,388 meals.

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Students

Students provide relief in Victoria

Family Medicine residents at DeTar Hospital in Victoria have worked in extreme conditions caring for patients during the hurricane, and now in the aftermath.

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Students

Making the most of idle time

Tim Surratt, a non-traditional student in the class of 2019, was stranded in Austin, unable to return home to Houston due to hazardous road conditions. He made the most of his time and volunteered. “It’s the worst thing ever because I love Houston so much, and I want to be there,” he told KVUE. “So at least I can help, instead of just standing by watching the news.”

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Students

Students rally around #BTHOHarvey campaign

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The student-led #BTHOHarvey campaign held a donation drive Sept. 2 at Reed Arena, raising $30,000.

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Students

LSU Tigers give back to Texas A&M

LSU President F. King Alexander encouraged the campus community to remember the help they received from Texas A&M during the 2016 Baton Rouge flood. Aggies raised $50,000 through the Side-by-Side campaign for LSU students, faculty and staff impacted by the flood.

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Former Students

Harvey news and relief forum

The Association of Former Students and the Texas A&M Foundation teamed up with TexAgs to create an online forum to help facilitate communication among Aggies in the wake of Hurricane Harvey.

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Former Students

A helping hand from Illinois

Former Student Blake Roderick, executive director of the Pike and Scott County Farm Bureaus in west central Illinois, thought of his friends from Texas A&M as the Illinois Farm Bureau mobilized to help South Texas ranchers and farmers.

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Former Students

Aggie family serves together

A family of Aggies braved the storm and rescued 20 people & 10 dogs from flooding in Bellaire

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Former Students

A graduate helped keep college students up to date

Texas A&M former student Susannah Hutcheson, class of 2017, aggregated valuable Texas university closure information for USA Today.

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Former Students

Dat Nguyen discusses damage to hometown

Former Aggie and Dallas Cowboys linebacker discussed the destruction of his hometown of Rockport with the Dallas Morning News.

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Former Students

Aggie broadcaster lends a hand

Houston sports radio broadcaster John P. Lopez, class of 1984, said on Twitter he assisted up to 20 people, two dogs and three horses.

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Former Students

Astronaut-turned Galveston CEO Mike Fossum recognizes a student

Galveston campus CEO Mike Fossum tweeted his thanks to a student who assisted in Harvey recovery efforts.

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Former Students

Myles Garrett gives a message of support

The All-American former Texas A&M defensive end joined his Cleveland Browns teammates and Texas natives in urging fans to support relief efforts in Houston.

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Former Students

Mike Evans asked fans to keep Galveston in their thoughts

The former Texas A&M and current Tampa Bay Buccaneers wide receiver asked fans to keep his home town of Galveston in their thoughts.

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Former Students

Rep. Flores shared emergency information

Congressman Bill Flores, a Texas A&M former student, shared crucial emergency information with constituents during the storm.

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Former Students

Rep. Hurd rallies volunteers

Congressman and former Texas A&M student body president Will Hurd shared volunteer information on Twitter.

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Former Students

Local meteorologist works around the clock

KBTX Chief Meteorologist Shel Winkley, a 2007 Texas A&M graduate, kept Brazos Valley residents and multiple local media outlets up to date on storm activity as the storm moved into the region.

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Former Students

Dallas A&M Club supports #BTHOHarvey

The alumni group urged its members to support student-led hurricane relief efforts.

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Former Students

Protecting Houstonians from E. coli

Professor Terry Gentry told ABC News that he had found elevated levels of E. coli in drinking water and flood water outside of Houston.

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Former Students

The Aggie Network commits to service

The Association of Former Students offered staff paid time off to assist with Hurricane Harvey recovery efforts.

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Former Students

Couple requests Harvey donations instead of gifts

Instead of asking for gifts for their upcoming wedding, Josh Herring, class of 2016, and Grace Winkelman requested on their registry that family and friends donate to Harvey relief.

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Former Students

An Aggie connection

Houston Texas A&M club members unloaded relief items that were collected in the Bryan-College Station area.

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Former Students

Jason's Deli steps up

jason's deli

Jason’s Deli founder Joe Tortorice Jr., class of 1970, and his wife passed out water bottles in Beaumont.

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Former Students

Aggie airmen provide relief

Former students Korry Hamman, class of 2002, and Brian Harper, class of 1998, serve as airline pilots in civilian roles, but were called upon as members of the 181st Airlift Squadron from the Texas Air National Guard based in Fort Worth to provide airlift support for Hurricane Harvey victims.

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Former Students

Von Miller donates $100,000

Former Aggie linebacker Von Miller wore a #BTHOHarvey t-shirt on the sidelines at the Texas A&M vs. UCLA football game Sunday night.

Former Aggie linebacker and current Denver Bronco Von Miller donated $100,000 to the #BTHO Harvey campaign. “My participation in this relief effort comes with a willingness to put my hands in the dirt and my boots on the ground alongside my fellow Aggies,” Miller said.

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Faculty & Staff

AgriLife economists examined the cost of Harvey for ranchers

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An estimated 1.2 million beef cows were affected by Hurricane Harvey. AgriLife Extension economists helped Texas ranchers evaluate the economic impact.

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Faculty & Staff

John Nielsen-Gammon provided his expertise to the world

Photo of closed highway

Texas A&M professor and Texas State Climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon lent his expertise in forecasting to numerous national media outlets, including an op-ed for Fortune.

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Faculty & Staff

A professor aided in rescues

Health and Kinesiology professor Wade Breaux traveled to the Houston area to participate in rescue efforts.

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Faculty & Staff

A surprise danger: floating ant colonies

Texas A&M AgriLife entomology specialists Mike Merchant and Wizzie Brown discussed the dangers of floating fire ant colonies for WIRED.

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Faculty & Staff

A Researcher Helped National Audiences Better Understand Flood Impact

(Sam Brody/MSNBC)

Texas A&M-Galveston researcher Sam Brody played a role in helping the world understand the potential for devastating floods in Houston in a 2016 Texas Tribune-Pro Publica piece and a nationally televised MSNBC interview during flooding.

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Faculty & Staff

Analyzing the decline in flood insurance purchases

Texas A&M economist James P. Gaines discusses why fewer Houstonians have purchased flood insurance over the past five years with ABC News.

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Faculty & Staff

Researchers warned of potential widespread power outages

Geography professor Dr. Brent McRoberts’ forecast model predicted before the storm that 1.25 million Texans would lose power.

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Faculty & Staff

Why is Houston so prone to severe flooding?

Climatologist Andrew Dessler told the Huffington Post that according to his research based on data collected by Texas A&M, Houston’s outward expansion has made it extremely vulnerable to flooding.

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Faculty & Staff

Outfitting Houston to bounce back from the next flood

Architecture and urban planning professor Philip Berke told Fast Company how Houston can mitigate the damage of the next hurricane if and when it hits.

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Faculty & Staff

An eye on the sky

Melissa Meierhofer, a wildlife researcher at the Texas A&M Natural Resources Institute, discussed Houston’s now-vulnerable bat population with Popular Science.

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Faculty & Staff

Keeping chemical facilities in check

Texas A&M researchers told the San Antonio Express-News why companies take the steps they do to keep people safe during natural disasters.

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Faculty & Staff

Protecting the Texas coast

Texas A&M professor Bill Merrell discussed with FastCompany why his proposed “Ike Dike” coastal barrier could protect Houston from the next major storm.

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Faculty & Staff

The downside of price controls

Associate professor of economics Jonathan Meer explained how price gouging helps mitigate some of the economic side effects common with natural disasters.

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Faculty & Staff

Underscoring the importance of wetlands protection

Coastal Watershed Program Director John Jacob explained to WIRED the importance of wetlands in the wake of Harvey flooding.

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Faculty & Staff

Explaining intricacies of transportation during disasters

Civil engineering professor John Barton discussed why transportation officials wait until the last possible moment to make certain transportation decisions in dealing with natural disasters.

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Faculty & Staff

AgriLife researchers assess damage to cotton industry

Up to 400,000 bales worth of cotton are still on the stalk in the affected region, spelling out trouble for some Texas cotton producers, but does not translate to more than a penny or so impact from the base price or the futures market.

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Faculty & Staff

Determining the threat of toxic waste

Texas A&M-Galveston scientist Wes Highfield collected water samples in Houston near sample ponds to determine if toxins were leaking into the water during flooding from Hurricane Harvey.

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Faculty & Staff

Enhancing communication lines during disasters

Work from Texas A&M researchers Radu Stoleru and Walt Magnussen will revolutionize the way first responders are able to communicate in times of disaster through The First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet).

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Faculty & Staff

Protecting consumers

Nancy Granovsky, AgriLife Extension family economics specialist, informed Texas consumers how they can protect themselves from scams, fraud and identity theft in the wake of Hurricane Harvey.

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Faculty & Staff

Next steps for better urban planning

Shannon Van Zandt, professor of landscape architecture and urban planning, told NBC News that catastrophic flooding may become more frequent unless there are changes made to Houston’s infrastructure.

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Faculty & Staff

Reckoning with climate change

Texas A&M research showed that climate change made Hurricane Harvey’s destruction more intense than expected.

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Faculty & Staff

Removing flood waters will be a tall task

Texas A&M researchers say removing the flood water from Houston could be more difficult than expected.

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Faculty & Staff

Assessing the responsibility of large businesses

A Texas A&M researcher told the New York Times that large companies bear some responsibility for assisting in recovery efforts.

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Faculty & Staff

Looking out for minority communities

Research scientists say Latino and low-income neighborhoods are at the most risk for experiencing chemical contamination

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Faculty & Staff

Academic adviser offers support

Mays Business School academic adviser Corey Dean Stone assisted in #BTHOHarvey efforts.

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Faculty & Staff

Predicting flooding-related threats

Sam Mannan of Texas A&M University’s Mary Kay O’Connor Process Safety Center told media outlets that a chemical plant near Houston could detonate a day before two explosions were reported.

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Faculty & Staff

Putting drone tech to work

Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue (CRASAR) Director Robin Murphy deployed drones in Fort Bend County to assist local officials monitor river heights and assess neighborhood damage.

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Faculty & Staff

Addressing the Arkema explosion

A Texas A&M chemical safety expert told the Associated Press that the risk management plan the Arkema facility is required by law to develop did not take into account “how it would deal with power and refrigeration failures or flooding.”

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Faculty & Staff

Mixed messages

Texans heard conflicting messages about how to keep themselves safe as Hurricane Harvey approached. Marine Sciences professor Ashley Ross explains why in The Conversation, and shares fixes Texas officials can make.

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Faculty & Staff

Houston and Galveston homebuyers "BeWhere"

The “Buyers BeWhere” tool developed by Sam Brody, director of the Center for Texas Beaches and Shores, allows users to type in an address for Harris or Galveston County and see a risk score for flooding, hurricanes, wildfire, air pollution and earthquakes.

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Faculty & Staff

Bush School faculty member, alums rescue Harvey victims

Getty Images captured the scene of Bush School Senior Lecturer Richard MacNamee carrying a girl to safety. It was one of many rescues he and other Bush School faculty made.

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Faculty & Staff

Texas A&M Geosciences crew weathered Hurricane Harvey at sea

In the midst of Hurricane Harvey, the GERG crew weathered 25-foot waves.

“We spent the next several days dancing with a hurricane out in the Gulf, bouncing around, weathering 25-foot waves,” GERG crew member Shawn Jarnagin said.

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Galveston students took shelter in College Station

71 Aggies and one dog named Crash from the Galveston campus settled at Park West Apartments Friday before Hurricane Harvey reached the coast.

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University

Aggie-owned Buc-ee's opens its doors to first responders

The convenience store, owned by 1980 graduate Arch “Beaver” Aplin, was thanked by a first responder with the Texas A&M Forest Service in a viral Facebook post for giving away food and drinks.

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University

Aggie football to wear Hurricane Harvey decals vs. UCLA

“It’s something that hits home with us with the number of players from the Gulf Coast area, and from Houston in particular, on our team. It’s a tough time for the people of Houston and the Gulf Coast, and our thoughts and prayers are with them,” Coach Kevin Sumlin told CBS Sports.

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University

Veterinarians were on the ground in Harvey’s aftermath

The Texas A&M University Veterinary Emergency Team provided aid to pets and rescue animals.

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University

The Corps of Cadets provided shelter for patrol horses

Houston mounted patrol horses were taken to Texas A&M ahead of Hurricane Harvey, where they were cared for by the Texas A&M Corps of Cadets and the Parsons Mounted Cavalry.

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University

Texas Task Force 1 Continued its long history of service

Texas Task Force 1 and its state and federal partners were on site in Houston and Harris County to assist in evacuation and relief efforts.

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University

CVM cared for animals in Bryan-College Station

After the College Station Fire Department rescued two horses from flood waters in town, the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (CVM) provided medical care.

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University

Protecting the Texas cattle industry

Texas A&M University’s AgriLife Extension Service specialist Andy Vestal told Bloomberg the agency has been assisting in the relocation of cattle and other animals.

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University

Analyzing a damaged transportation infrastructure

TTI research engineer Dave Newcomb told the Washington Post about the challenges Houston faces in repairing its transportation infrastructure.

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University

Outlining the dangers of rampant development

Texas A&M Wetlands research showed how freshwater wetland loss contributed to catastrophic flooding in Houston.

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Putting research into action

New Scientist called Texas A&M’s “Ike Dike” the “biggest contender” when it comes to finding new ways to protect the Texas coast.

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University

Aggie soccer lends a hand

The Aggie soccer team helped the Bryan-College Station community send supplies to those affected by flooding in the Houston area.

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Texas Forest Service provides boots on the ground

A total of 950 Texas A&M Forest Service emergency responders are positioned along the Texas Gulf Coast to provide post-Hurricane Harvey service.

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University

Easterwood Airport served as a responder hub

The Today Show broadcasted live from Texas A&M-operated Easterwood Airport, which served as a staging ground for rescue operations flying into Houston.

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University

College of Medicine steps up to serve fellow Houstonians

Texas A&M College of Medicine Houston Campus students volunteered on a medical team helping serve fellow Houstonians for the second graveyard shift in a row as NRG Stadium opened to accommodate 10,000 more survivors whose homes have flooded and who’ve lost nearly everything in the process.

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University

College of Dentistry to provide care to hurricane victims

The College of Dentistry is coordinating an effort to provide oral health care to refugees from Hurricane Harvey and working with corporate partners to assemble basic oral hygiene kits for distribution.

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HSC team assists in environmental sampling post-Harvey

EpiAssist, a service-learning program directed by Jennifer Horney, Ph.D., will be in Houston conducting environmental sampling over the next several weeks in areas identified by community residents as locations for ponding and pooling of debris.

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University

Sea Grant program shares vital information

The Sea Grant at Texas A&M program served as an information hub for post-hurricane relief.

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University

George H.W. Bush sends message of support

Bush, namesake of Texas A&M’s Bush School of Government and Public Service, messaged his support for communities suffering in the wake of Hurricane Harvey saying “Barbara and I are in Maine, but our hearts are in Houston.”

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University

Open arms for victims

Texas A&M Student Counseling services offered special support groups for students impacted by Hurricane Harvey-related devastation.

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University

Connected by sport

Texas A&M Golf Club opened its course to Sam Houston State golfers for practice while their community recovers from Hurricane Harvey.

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University

All System hands on deck

Chancellor John Sharp said members of the Texas A&M Forest Service, Texas Task Force 1, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension and the Texas A&M Veterinary Emergency Team are among the personnel from the A&M System to head into the disaster zone.

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University

Providing tech assistance for responders

Texas A&M IT played a role in rescue and recovery operations by providing information technology assistance to FEMA operations at the RELLIS campus and a temporary WiFi setup for Texas Task Force 1.

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University

Corps blood drive

The Texas A&M held a blood drive Aug. 31 with the Gulf Coast Regional Blood Center.

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University

Aggie Basketball chips in

The Texas A&M basketball team set up a clothing drive for victims of Hurricane Harvey.

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University

Texas A&M offers free football tickets

Hurricane Harvey first responders, volunteers and victims were offered free tickets to the first two Aggie home football games.

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University

Texas A&M Equipment staff shows support on the road

The truck carrying the football team’s equipment will display a special decal showing support for flood victims on its cross-country road trip to California ahead of the UCLA game.

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University

BUILD sets its sights on the Houston area

Students and faculty involved with BUILD are converting shipping containers into mobile medical clinics to help Southeast Texas families in need.

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President Young encouraged students to step up and serve

Texas A&M President Michael K. Young spent time with students in College Station after the flood gathering food to send to Hurricane Harvey victims.

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University

Reveille IX provided comfort

Mascot Reveille IX visited students from the Galveston campus displaced by the storm.

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University

CTBS fills vital data role

The Center for Texas Beaches and Shores proved to be a vital resource for hurricane information for numerous media outlets.

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Keeping 'TABS' on the Gulf Coast

The Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS), allowed Texans to monitor hurricane activity with half-hourly updates.

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University

VP Pugh rallies support for Harvey relief

Texas A&M Vice President for Student Affairs Daniel J. Pugh, Sr. assisted in #BTHOHarvey efforts, hosting students at the Vice President’s residence on campus.

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University

Houston Police Department gives thanks

HPD publicly thanked Texas A&M for looking after its patrol horses while officers focused efforts on flood rescue and recovery.

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Helping stranded students

Texas A&M offered assistance to students stranded by flood waters in ways big and small.

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The Bush Library stepped up

Bush Library staff helped deliver supplies to victims of Hurricane Harvey.

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Help Desk Central fielded calls

Texas A&M IT took nearly 600 calls from concerned students, faculty and staff before, during and after Hurricane Harvey, connecting them with helpful information.

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Could Texas A&M's "Ike Dike" become a reality?

Texas legislators asked federal officials to explore building Texas A&M’s proposed protective wall dubbed the “Ike Dike” to protect the Gulf region from the next storm nearly three months before Hurricane Harvey struck.

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University

Preserving Coastal Ecosystems

The Shark Biology and Fisheries Science Lab conducts research on sharks and bony fishes of marine ecosystems, including how those ecosystems react when hurricanes strike coasts.

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University

Aggie softball donates gear

The Texas A&M softball team set aside clothing to send to Hurricane Harvey victims.

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Texas A&M System partners with FEMA

The RELLIS campus will serve as a logistics center for FEMA for the next several weeks as it conducts relief operations for Houston and Southeast Texas.

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Health Science Center Aggies provide medical care

Texas A&M Health Science Center students, faculty and staff stepped up to aid in Hurricane Harvey relief efforts.

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University

Rescued puppies provide relief for responders

puppy

Rescued puppies receiving VET services have served a dual role, providing “puppy therapy” for many of the responders.

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Texas A&M Opens Fund For Aggies Affected By Hurricane Harvey

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Texas A&M University has announced a student and employee disaster relief fund to help with small-but-essential, one-time immediate needs.

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Gov. Abbott selects System Chancellor John Sharp to lead post-Harvey rebuilding effort

Sharp

Chancellor Sharp will lead the newly-formed Governor’s Commission to Rebuild Texas.